#2291 | Wednesday, September 11th 2002
ITS FUNNY HOW SOME THINGS STICK IN YOUR MIND AND OTHERS DISAPPEAR LIKE I CAN REMEMBER WHAT I HAD ON THAT DAY
HOWEVER, I CANT REMEMBER WHAT I ATE.

I WAS SITTING IN MY CAR ON MY WAY TO WORK, A NEW JOB ID ONLY BEEN AT FOR A FEW WEEKS. I HAD THE RADIO ON I HAD JUST PASSED THE PENTAGON EXIT AND WAS AT A STOP LIGHT. IT SEEMED AS IF THE WORLD MOVED IN SLOW MOTION. THE CARS THAT WERE RACING BY SEAM TO SLOW EVEN THE LIGHT CHANGING FROM RED TO GREEN SEAMED SLOW.

MY HUSBAND WAS HOME SICK THAT DAY SO HE WAS SLEEP. HE DIDN?T ANSWER THE PHONE UNTIL I GOT TO WORK AND HE WAS IN TOTAL DISBELIEF. ITS FUNNY TO ME HOW I CAN REMEMBER ALL OF IMAGES AND WORDS BUT I DON?T REMEMBER DRIVING THE THREE BLOCKS AFTER THE ANNOUNCEMENT. I CALLED MY HUSBAND BECAUSE HIS FAMILY WAS FROM NY AND WANTED TO MAKE SURE EVERYONE WAS OK I NEVER GUESSED WE WERE LIVING HISTORY. THE BUILDING I WORK IN SHOOK WHEN THE PENTAGON WAS HIT, IT WAS LIKE THUNDER OR A BOOM OF A RADIOS BASE.

THE EVENTS OF THAT DAY ARE BURNED IN MY MIND LIKE MY BIRTH DAY, MY SS# AND MY FIRST KISS I WILL NEVER FORGET THEM.

J NOLAN
ARLINGTON, VA

JACKIE NOLAN | 35 | Virginia

#2260 | Wednesday, September 11th 2002
On the anniversary of 9/11 I found myself standing in the exact same spot
of my bedroom that I was this time last year, still in awe. Dressing for work while watching GMA then and now. Frozen in time and weeping with tears as the revelations and their magnitude begin to sink in. Ironically I had just flown from DC on 9/10/01 from visiting my brother who is now a few months from retiring from the Army (thank you GOD). Where was I on 9/11/01 the same place I am on 9/11/02. Humbled, proud, afraid yet fearless, blessed and thankful. I didn't loose any one personally close to me, but on that morning, standing in front of my television, in my home, in TN, nothing in my life mattered except life, love and liberty.

Audrey White | 35 | Tennessee

#2073 | Wednesday, September 11th 2002
I was one of the lucky ones.

Commuting into the city was hard enough before Sept 11th, I never expected to have to worry about my life.
The Path had stopped. A few seconds after I stepped out of the train, I heard and felt a 'boom' and some of the fire retardant material covering the beams fell in front of me. I looked around and people were milling and walking around as usual, not disturbed by the sound. I started smelling oil. I looked back and thought 'should I jump back into the train?' The last thing I wanted was to be trapped in a train car somewhere between NY and NJ; second only to that was to be trapped underground. I decided that I was going to make a run for it (to the street) and alert people as I left.

I told myself "don't look back- If it is a false alarm, I'll get some excersize, otherwise I'll find out what happened on the news after I am away from here." As I was proceeding out quickly telling everyone to get out, one person who was standing around asked me 'should I be leaving?'.

I was amazed that more people didn't start walking fast/running/etc. When I was near the exit, I briefly looked right down a corridor and saw smoke and people running. At that point, I knew something had happened; I wasn't sure what (bomb/internal explosion). As I left the building, I saw debris of all sorts falling and a gallery of people staring up. Seeing papers, briefcases, and other small items falling all around me, I started running to get around all the people who were stopped and staring at the mayhem. As I was running through the empty spaces without people to get to the street, I started screaming at them to run away from the building. I again was amazed that they were so stunned. My new goal was to get far away from the site - the staten island ferry seemed to be the furtherest point away from the site, where I might be able to get off of the island (Manhattan is an Island off the coast of NJ). I had to weave in and around people who were unaware what just happened. When I finally arrived around ten minutes later at the ferry, I tried to call my wife on my mobile phone, the line was dead. I ran to a phone booth and tried calling-the line was busy. Then I talked to the people at the ferry to see if I could leave-no luck. I was told that an airplane had hit the WTC. I thought to myself 'wha are the chances of that happening', just like in the story 'The world according to Garp'. Since I was stuck on the island, I decided to head immediately to where I worked (An Investment firm), to see if I could be of any use.

When I arrived, everyone was OUTSIDE the building. I was told, since the plane could have been caused by terrorism, our building was the largest on the waterfront. After a few minutes, we saw the second plane fly straight for the WTC. At that point we realized it was an act of terrorism. I thought 'what would happen if they had biological weapons on-board?' After a few minutes discussing our emegency procedures, we saw the top of the WTC fall over. It looked like it was in a movie. I thought for a second, and said "uh-oh. We have a problem, who is following me!" I was asked why, and replied "take a look, the smoke and whatever is inside is heading our way, we can't be outside. I'm leaving in 10 seconds whoever wants to follow is more than welcome". After 10 Seconds, I stated I was on my way and headed toward the water, another co-worker followed' While I was sprinting, my cell phone rang! Still running, I answered it-my brother. I politely told him I that I was ok, but currently running for my life (not knowing what was in the plume of smoke heading our way). Upon reaching the water, We saw a multitude of people trying to cross the bridge. Thinking it was ludicrous to cross and be stuck in the middle of the bridge,just to get smoke inhalation, We decided to duck into the DTC (Depository Trust Corporation-where they hold peoples securities certificates), which had double doors.

Before getting inside the DTC, we couldn't breath because of the smoke. We put our shirts over our mouths and quickly made it in the doors of the DTC.

Within minutes, the smoke engulfed everything. It became dark, and strangely cold. Now THIS made me worried. I didn't know what chemicals I breathed in, but the deed was done. I felt terrible for the large number of people who were on the bridge, not being able to breathe, and I didn't have any equipment to help them- All I could do is wait and let people use my phone to let people know they were OK.
One of the workers had a radio, so we turned it on and listened to the news. We couldn't see outside because of the smoke.

I called my wife to let her know I was OK. She was hysterical and told me she was going to find a way to get me off the island. I tried to convice her to stay put, but once she has decided something, it is impossible to change her mind.

When the smoke started clearing a few hours later, we found out that emergency ferry services were transporting people to the red cross. So all the people who needed to go to NJ, decided to walk to the ferry services together. We were amazed how quickly police and military were deployed around the area. I helped people over the road divider to get to the area the ferries were docked. Unfortunately, one of the more portly women was a little too heavy and fell on me, which threw my back out. Luckily the woman was OK and the last one. I hobbled over to the ferry and was taked across the water to the Red cross center. It took several hours for me to contact my wife and find an appropriate meeting place. As the hours went by, my back started hurting me more and more, but there were many others who really needed help from the emergency teams.

My wife had driven to Jersey city upon hanging up the phone. She tried to buy a boat to cross the river, but couldn't. It took several phone calls, each with a heightening frustration level until I knew where should could meet me.
I was ecstatic to finally see my wife. She had been terribly worried for me.
All the roads were closed, so getting home was difficult.
I was very glad to get home to my loving wife.

Every day, for weeks, The air smelled acrid and the military was everywhere.
Every day, my wife worried about the chemicals I was inhaling, just being in manhattan.
Every day, my wife worried there would be more attacks, since there were many unpublicized bomb threats in buildings, the docks, and subways.
Every day, my wife worried about the commuting, which took 3+ hours each way.
Every day, my wife worried about hearing about which of our friends were just missing or dead.
I finally found a way to ease my wife's worry - we moved.

I feel terrible for all the families and friends which were affected by not only attack, but by the great demands placed on the many people who helped get everyone affected back on their feet again.


I am also in debt to all those people in the public service for their continued dedication and help.


I can only state, I am one of the lucky ones.


Daniel Rosengarten | 35 | New York

#2068 | Wednesday, September 11th 2002
I was one of the luck ones.
Commuting into the city was hard enough before Sept 11th, I never expected to have to worry about my life.
The Path had stopped. A few seconds after I stepped out of the train, I heard and felt a 'boom' and some of the fire retardant material covering the beams fell in front of me. I looked around and people were milling and walking around as usual, not disturbed by the sound. I started smelling oil. I looked back and thought 'should I jump back into the train?' The last thing I wanted was to be trapped in a train car somewhere between NY and NJ; second only to that was to be trapped underground. I decided that I was going to make a run for it (to the street) and alert people as I left.
I told myself "don't look back- If it is a false alarm, I'll get some excersize, otherwise I'll find out what happened on the news after I am away from here." As I was proceeding out quickly telling everyone to get out, one person who was standing around asked me 'should I be leaving?'.
I was amazed that more people didn't start walking fast/running/etc. When I was near the exit, I briefly looked right down a corridor and saw smoke and people running. At that point, I knew something had happened; I wasn't sure what (bomb/internal explosion). As I left the building, I saw debris of all sorts falling and a gallery of people staring up. Seeing papers, briefcases, and other small items falling all around me, I started running to get around all the people who were stopped and staring at the mayhem. As I was running through the empty spaces without people to get to the street, I started screaming at them to run away from the building. I again was amazed that they were so stunned. My new goal was to get far away from the site - the staten island ferry seemed to be the furtherest point away from the site, where I might be able to get off of the island (Manhattan is an Island off the coast of NJ). I had to weave in and around people who were unaware what just happened. When I finally arrived around ten minutes later at the ferry, I tried to call my wife on my mobile phone, the line was dead. I ran to a phone booth and tried calling-the line was busy. Then I talked to the people at the ferry to see if I could leave-no luck. I was told that an airplane had hit the WTC. I thought to myself 'wha are the chances of that happening', just like in the story 'The world according to Garp'. Since I was stuck on the island, I decided to head immediately to where I worked (An Investment firm), to see if I could be of any use.
When I arrived, everyone was OUTSIDE the building. I was told, since the plane could have been caused by terrorism, our building was the largest on the waterfront. After a few minutes, we saw the second plane fly straight for the WTC. At that point we realized it was an act of terrorism. I thought 'what would happen if they had biological weapons on-board?' After a few minutes discussing our emegency procedures, we saw the top of the WTC fall over. It looked like it was in a movie. I thought for a second, and said "uh-oh. We have a problem, who is following me!" I was asked why, and replied "take a look, the smoke and whatever is inside is heading our way, we can't be outside. I'm leaving in 10 seconds whoever wants to follow is more than welcome". After 10 Seconds, I stated I was on my way and headed toward the water, another co-worker followed' While I was sprinting, my cell phone rang! Still running, I answered it-my brother. I politely told him I that I was ok, but currently running for my life (not knowing what was in the plume of smoke heading our way). Upon reaching the water, We saw a multitude of people trying to cross the bridge. Thinking it was ludicrous to cross and be stuck in the middle of the bridge,just to get smoke inhalation, We decided to duck into the DTC (Depository Trust Corporation-where they hold peoples securities certificates), which had double doors.
Before getting inside the DTC, we couldn't breath because of the smoke. We put our shirts over our mouths and quickly made it in the doors of the DTC.

Within minutes, the smoke engulfed everything. It became dark, and strangely cold. Now THIS made me worried. I didn't know what chemicals I breathed in, but the deed was done. I felt terrible for the large number of people who were on the bridge, not being able to breathe, and I didn't have any equipment to help them- All I could do is wait and let people use my phone to let people know they were OK.
One of the workers had a radio, so we turned it on and listened to the news. We couldn't see outside because of the smoke.
I called my wife to let her know I was OK. She was hysterical and told me she was going to find a way to get me off the island. I tried to convice her to stay put, but once she has decided something, it is impossible to change her mind.
When the smoke started clearing a few hours later, we found out that emergency ferry services were transporting people to the red cross. So all the people who needed to go to NJ, decided to walk to the ferry services together. We were amazed how quickly police and military were deployed around the area. I helped people over the road divider to get to the area the ferries were docked. Unfortunately, one of the more portly women was a little too heavy and fell on me, which threw my back out. Luckily the woman was OK and the last one. I hobbled over to the ferry and was taked across the water to the Red cross center. It took several hours for me to contact my wife and find an appropriate meeting place. As the hours went by, my back started hurting me more and more, but there were many others who really needed help from the emergency teams.
My wife had driven to Jersey city upon hanging up the phone. She tried to buy a boat to cross the river, but couldn't. It took several phone calls, each with a heightening frustration level until I knew where should could meet me.
I was ecstatic to finally see my wife. She had been terribly worried for me.
All the roads were closed, so getting home was difficult.
I was very glad to get home to my loving wife.

Every day, for weeks, The air smelled acrid and the military was everywhere.
Every day, my wife worried about the chemicals I was inhaling, just being in manhattan.
Every day, my wife worried there would be more attacks, since there were many unpublicized bomb threats in buildings, the docks, and subways.
Every day, my wife worried about the commuting, which took 3+ hours each way.
Every day, my wife worried about hearing about which of our friends were just missing or dead.
I finally found a way to ease my wife's worry - we moved.

I feel terrible for all the families and friends which were affected by not only attack, but by the great demands placed on the many people who helped get everyone affected back on their feet again.

I am also in debt to all those people in the public service for their continued dedication and help.

I can only state, I am one of the luck ones.

Daniel Rosengarten | 35 | New York

#2048 | Wednesday, September 11th 2002
I work on Pine Street (next to Wall Street) and heard a private plane had hit the first tower. I went down to see what was going on and was about a block away when I saw the second plane hit. Lucky to be alive. Life is a gift. Don't take it for granted...

It's 8:10 a.m. September 11th. I'm heading down the block now to pay my respects.

Peace to all...

Philip Smith | 35 | New York

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