#1192 | Friday, April 19th 2002
I don't think Britain should be helping the Americans because they don't appreciate it, the British soldiers are risking their lives for a country that couldn't give a toss about Britain helping. The Americans werent bothered that we kept getting bombed by the IRA where lots of people lost their lives. But as soon as it happens to them they expect everyone to unite with them and feel sorry for them which I don't.

SO......

FIGHT YOUR OWN WAR!!!!!!!

A British Person | 40 | Alaska

#1189 | Wednesday, April 17th 2002
On the morning of September 11, 2001, I was talking with a co-worker when we got a phone call from a partner's wife asking if something was going on at the World Trade Center. We looked out the window to see that there was fire and smoke but did not know until that phone call that a plane had hit. I immediately ran to my desk to call my sister who worked for Cantor Fitzgerald on the 105th floor. Unfortunately, I never heard from her that day or ever since. While I was trying to reach my sister, the second plane hit. I am thankful that I was not watching like so many others when that second plane hit. Our company sent everyone out of the building soon after and I did not return to the office for three days and then only for a short while. Til this day I cannot look over into New York City. There is such a void staring back at me and it breaks my heart every single time I look that way even over seven months later. Forever In My Heart.
Raquel Negron | 40 | New Jersey

#1165 | Monday, April 8th 2002
I got out of the shower and turned on the TV to listen to the news. Something I do every day. Normally it's the "usual" news. I heard something about planes hitting the World Trade Center. I went over to the TV to see what happened. I saw the buildings on fire. It seemed so unreal. I kept getting ready for work and listening to the TV and stopping what I was doing several times to look at the TV screen. My three children got up for school and I told them what had happened. Everything seemed so quiet that morning. I remember feeling apprehensive about sending my children off to school. I felt an emptiness as my two older children left. I hugged them extra. I walked my seven year old to school and watched in silence as he walked to his classroom. The thing that strikes me the most is how quiet everything seemed in the world. No emotions. Everyone's faces were like stone. I drove to work. I couldn't concentrate on anything. It seemed so weird to be at work trying to conduct business while all this was happening in the world. They let us go home early. I was glad. It seemed wrong to be at work on that day. I wanted to be safe at home with my children.

Jeanette Velasquez | 40 | Arizona

#1072 | Tuesday, March 19th 2002
It was the usual hurry get out of bed and into the shower, quick get a cup of tea, turn on the news, and catch the weather kind of morning. But after only a few minutes of the regular news they said there was a breaking story from N.Y. As they began to feed the live coverage from N.Y. I had this horrible sinking feeling. They said the fire had only been burning for a short time. But how could it have spread so quickly? Then to my horror from the corner of the shot they were showing I saw the airplane hit the other building. What began to seem plain enough to me, was not even apparent to the news anchors here on the west coast. But one news anchor must have took another look and realized what she had actually seen. I had this horrible empty, sinking, edge of my seat feeling. My hands were cold and my eyes were wet. How could I explain to my own children what this was. They asked me if someone had died. They could not understand why someone would fly a plane into a building. I tried to keep myself together not only for them, but for all the school children I see every day. They must have some sense of safety, that school was a good place to be. When I still think about that day I get the same feeling again. My overwhelming thought of those that suffered and lost is saddest of all. Please remember that you and your families are in my thoughts every day. We will not forget!
suzy albin | 40 | California

#1055 | Monday, March 18th 2002
I was at home alone when I heard the news. I dropped my children off at school about 8am central, and came home with the intention to head straight to bed (I work nights and sleep days). Just before settling into bed, I checked my answering machine. There was one message, from my husband. He said the WTC had been hit and said I might want to check the news.

I went back downstairs and turned on the TV. The second tower had just been hit. I could not believe my eyes as I watched the smoke billowing from the towers. I will never forget one CNN newscaster watching in silence as the first tower fell, and then finally saying "Dear God, there are no words..."

I think someone must finally have whispered into his earpiece, telling him to say something, anything. But I will never forget the tone of his voice as he said "there are no words." As indeed there weren't any words sufficient to describe this horror.

I continued watching the news, horrified and yet mesmerized, for several hours. I remember hearing that the Pentagon had been hit, a rumor that the Mall in DC was on fire, another rumor that the Capitol was targeted, the report that a plane was down in Pennsylvania, hearing about the frantic evacuation of the White House. I remember feeling stunned and wondering if I should pick my children up from school, get them away from a public place.

I called a relative in CA and woke him up, described what had happened to him, told him to turn on his TV. He said, "well, our world has changed forever."

Finally I tried to sleep for a couple of hours. Tossed and turned with bad dreams, then got up to get ready for work that night. Every TV in the hospital was on the news, in the lobby, in the patient rooms, even in ICU. But the people were strangely hushed about it. Everyone just watching in stunned silence. Occasionally an expression of disbelief and horror. But not much conversation. It was just too much to take in.


Becky | 40 | Texas

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